Science and Solutions

Resilient cities more likely to bounce back from future shocks

Late last year, the US-based Rockefeller Foundation named Melbourne as one of 33 cities in the first wave of its 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge.

Arron Wood     10-Jun-2014

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Current Articles


Pest-suppressive landscapes: thinking outside the field
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We've all heard of ‘thinking outside the box'. Now farmers managing pests in their crops are being asked to think outside the field.
Michele Sabto     21-Jul-2014
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Citizen science and mobile technologies evolve together
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Mobile tech gives citizen scientists the edge in data collection for small budget, big scope projects
Beth Askham     21-Jul-2014
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Hot and bothered: our health under climate change
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As citizens living in a developed economy, we have a certain level of control over our health. Most of us have access to medicines, treatments and health services designed to cure our ills, or at least minimise pain. We also have access to information about dietary and lifestyle choices to help ensure we lead healthy, active and productive lives.
Bianca Nogrady     10-Jul-2014
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Rise of the jellies
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Think of a creature that's top of its food chain, and chances are you'd pick something with big teeth and a large brain. You'd be pretty certain not to choose something that doesn't even have a brain.
Virginia Tressider     02-Jul-2014
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Drought in store as El Niño's western cousin to grow stronger
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Over the past few months, a lot of attention has been paid to the potentially strong El Niño event brewing in the Pacific Ocean. But there is also the potential for an emerging climate phenomenon in the Indian Ocean that could worsen the impacts of an El Niño, bringing drought to Australia and its neighbours.
Agus Santoso and Wenju Cai     16-Jun-2014
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Pilbara shows how to save the most species per dollar
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Across northern Australia, small native mammals are disappearing at an alarming rate, and other animals and plants are also in decline. One major problem is finding the best way to use funds to manage threats to disappearing plants and animals. In the Pilbara region of Western Australia, 15 per cent of the original mammal species have already disappeared, and more species stand to go if growing threats are left unchecked.
Josie Carwardine, Andrew Reeson, Belinda Walters, Iadine Chadès, Jennifer Firn, Sam Nicol, Stephen van Leeuwen and Tara Martin     16-Jun-2014
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Much loss and an uncertain future for Australia’s unique mammals
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Australia's mammal fauna is the most distinctive of any continent. It includes many species and groups of remarkable antiquity. At the time of European settlement, many Australian mammal species were extraordinarily abundant, and many had pivotal ecological roles.
John Woinarski, Andrew Burbidge and Peter Harrison     10-Jun-2014
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Resilient cities more likely to bounce back from future shocks
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Late last year, the US-based Rockefeller Foundation named Melbourne as one of 33 cities in the first wave of its 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge.
Arron Wood     10-Jun-2014
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Four mysteries of the Indian Ocean
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Despite being the third largest ocean in the world, the Indian Ocean is one of the least explored marine environments. Covering around 20 per cent of the Earth's surface and spanning more than 73 million square kilometres, it's an important channel for over half the world's shipping.
Simon Torok     03-Jun-2014
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Why collect?
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CSIRO is the custodian of many large biological collections – of insects, fish, seeds, plants, wildlife and algae – that contribute to national and international scientific knowledge. Why are specimen collections so important? Dr Jeff Leis, from the Australian Museum, explains.
Jeff Leis     02-Jun-2014
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