Science and Solutions

Indigenous intellectual property and desert knowledge

In this second part of an ECOS interview with CSIRO researcher Dr Jocelyn Davies, Mike McRae asks about the ethical issues involved in engaging with other cultures, and how Australia’s desert heart might shape the nation’s future.

    26-Aug-2013

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