About ECOS

Since 1974, ECOS has reported on sustainability issues from a scientific perspective for Australia’s national scientific research agency, CSIRO.

Through well-researched features relevant research, ECOS serves as a forum for:

  • authoritative articles focused on the environment and sustainability
  • raising awareness of ecological principles, and
  • explaining the challenges and benefits of good sustainable development.

ECOS is widely read in the workplace, government departments, universities, schools, libraries and environment centres around Australia.


In 2011, after 37 years, the magazine moved to an online only format extending its reach to a broader national and international community of interest. All content is freely accessible.  


In 2015, ECOS started a new chapter as a blog. With the same emphasis on sustainability and science the new blog publishes articles regularly.


This online archive of around 6000 articles is a rich source of material for anyone seeking to understand sustainability issues and how these have developed, been addressed and, in many case, remain current today.


(NOTE: republication of content is subject to copyright provisions under the ´Permissions & Disclaimer´ section below.) 



Permissions & disclaimer


CSIRO and/or third parties reserve all rights to the content, artwork and photographs in ECOS. Permission to reproduce text, photos and artwork must be sought from ECOS.


The Australian Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments permit downloading and use of an article by an individual or educational institution for non-commercial personal use or study. Multiple reproduction of any ECOS article in a study block is governed by rights agreement managed by Copyright Agency Limited and fees may apply.


Authors published in ECOS have the moral right under Australian law to be acknowledged as the creator.


While reasonable effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the content on this site, CSIRO and CSIRO PUBLISHING accept no responsibility for any loss or damage from the direct or indirect use of or reliance on the content.


Advertising material displayed on the ECOS website does not necessarily represent the views of CSIRO.

  
 
Ecos Issue 203 - Table of Contents

Feature Product

Gold Coast Transformed

Gold Coast Transformed

Illustrates how and why major environmentally destructive development took place and discusses the impacts of such development on the Gold Coast's beaches, wildlife, and terrestrial and marine environments.

ECOS Archive

Welcome to the ECOS Archive site which brings together 40 years of sustainability articles from 1974-2014.

For more recent ECOS articles visit the blog. You can also sign up to the email alert or RSS feed